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Jamie Joseph is currently overseas and available for public speaker events worldwide. For booking inquiries please email wildlifejustice@tutanota.com. 100% of speaker fees are invested into the anti corruption fund.

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Recent news…

Jamie Joseph, founder of Saving the Wild, will be touring the United States on a ‪#‎2016YearOfTheRhino‬ speaker tour starting last week of July. Cities include Washington DC, New York and San Francisco. She will be talking about her ongoing ‪#‎BloodRhinoBlacklist‬ battle to dismantle a ‪rhino‬ ‪poaching‬ syndicate, and the real value of bordering rural communities to the anti poaching strategy.

Fear is like fire, it can burn you or it can fuel you. As an activist I fear bearing witness to the extinction of an iconic species far more than I fear taking on a poaching syndicate. The illegal wildlife trade is a joyride for syndicates, and journalism is failing to expose the corruption that makes their deadly playground possible. Too many people get stuck in a job they resent, and they end up dying before they’re dead. Sure, I live on the edge of sensibility, but that’s where the magic happens.

Read: Activist journalism can save the wild.


Jamie_Joseph__Thuli_Madonsela_Phinda_10.4.16Jamie Joseph and Public Protector Thuli Madonsela with Zululand wildlife ambassadors

Read: Rural communities are saving rhinos


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In August 2015 I set out on a 14 week mission ‘solving poverty saves wildlife’ – a global showcase of community conservation stories illustrating how we can save Africa’s iconic animals when we tackle the poverty link to the poaching crisis. From Zimbabwe to Zambia, South Africa to Kenya, pioneering conservationists have continued to exceed expectations, carving a path to the end game in the race to save elephants and rhinos from extinction.

Read: Best of Saving the Wild 2015 #SolvingPovertySavesWildlife.



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“If she goes below five breaths a minute we’re in trouble,” The vet says calmly.

The spear wound is deep, and at least twenty minutes has passed before they start sealing the wound with a type of clay that looks like war paint.

“Four deep breaths on the minute,” I call out just as I feel something squeeze my heart. “Come on girl,” I whisper to Jetta, and at that moment her trunk gently flicks up, signally the M99 drug is starting to wear off…

Read: Saving Jetta, Kenya’s teenage elephant speared in the back






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